SEVEN STEPS TO GREAT DESIGN

You can bring life to your ideas & tell your story.

Share your ideas the way it’s done in the industry: visually. From fashion illustration to a winning portfolio, show your designs so the world can see them.
Image: Phil Padilla, Digital Illustration

Fashion Illustration
Mondays, 10 am-1 pm
Sept 12-Nov 28
All the way from London, England, Kel Jackson magically will turn you into a fashion designer. Start with a pencil and piece of paper. Decide upon the look of a garment and make it move.
Need a kit with all the right tools? Click here
Image: PFI senior Kyle Woods

Adobe Illustrator for Fashion
Wednesdays,2-5 pm
Sept 14-Nov 30
Stop trying to learn it though YouTube and get the short cuts and inside tricks from Rianna Aguirre, designer for Thread Theory and many others.
Still nervous? Try this starter class:

Adobe Prep
Weds & Thurs, 2-5 pm
Sept 7 & 8
Image: Jevon Ruis

Flats & Technical Packages
Mondays, 6-9 pm
Sept 12-Nov 28
Expand your Adobe know-how into the very skills that will get you a job with Nancy Simon who creates specs and techs for a living.
Don’t forget PFI students get the Adobe student discount.
Image: PFI senior Meghan Lee

Color Theory
Mondays, 6-9 pm
Oct 24-Nov 28
Let Kimmy Schenter, head of color innovation for Under Armour, help you choose color that intrigues, excites and motivates.
Color kit included in class.

Graphic Design
Tuesdays, 6-9 pm
Sept 13-Oct 18
As the product strategy director for PineCrest, Jena Nesbitt knows how to turn simple lines and shapes into a creative pattern that tells a story.

Computer Print Design
Tuesdays, 6-9 pm
Oct 25-Nov 29
Use what you learned in Graphic Design to become a print designer — then print your own fabric by the end of this class.
During this class, you will print your own design on fabric that you can cut, sew then wear.
Image: PFI grad Jessy Burris, Candy Lagoon

Digital Illustration
Saturday, 10 am-4 pm
Oct 29
Design on the go with an iPad, stylus and guidance from Phil Padilla, senior men’s apparel color designer for Nike.
Download the program on your iPad or borrow one from PFI
Image: Phil Padilla

Portfolio
Thursdays, 6-9 pm
Sept 15-Dec 8
Put your story together and show why you are the best candidate for a job, a promotion and your future — with Nike’s Dana Eberlein.
Present your skills to a panel of managers from Nike.
Image: PFI grad Charlie Ryan, Chuck’s Lab

Next blogs:  Secrets of lingerie, textiles, machine knitting, innovative design.

Find your success in apparel business.

Workwear meets sportswear concept wins Portland teen a Fashion Scholarship

Tuesday, June 22, 2021

 

 

Workwear meets sportswear concept wins Portland teen a Fashion Scholarship

The pandemic is nearly over. It’s time for a new, more practical way to think about clothes. What need do they fill? What we should buy and why?

It’s that thoughtful point of view that won Gabriel Madlangbayan of Jefferson High School a fashion design scholarship at Portland Fashion Institute, Portland’s only accredited fashion school.

It’s the tenth year for PFI’s scholarship contest. This year the school focused on persons of color.

Madlangbayan came up with a concept of combining workwear with sportswear. He designed and created a warm but functioning outerwear jacket — quite a feat for a beginner. He then demonstrated its use by skateboarding in the snow and letting his jacket cushion the blow when he fell.

His focus, however, is on more than just fashion.

“One of my favorite things about skateboarding is the people,” he says. “I’ve noticed there is little to no discrimination among the community, whether that’s age, race or gender. Everyone seems to accept each other. Knowing this while being a person of color definitely gives me a lot more confidence.

“I’m looking forward now to learning professional skills at PFI,” he says, “and the business of fashion.”

Madlangbayan is 17. After his education at PFI, he would like to work for Nike or Adidas. But he has his sights on bigger things.

“I know [what I created] is not really a revolutionary idea or something that will change the game in the fashion world, but I just wanted to do something that was important to me and my friends. I figured that should come first.”

PFI’s annual scholarship aims to give young designers a path into one of Portland’s many major apparel manufacturing companies. It is open to full-time students in Portland and Vancouver area high schools who have a GPA of 2.5 or more. Each contestant creates an original apparel design idea with sketches, interviews of influential people and an essay on fashion design.

Judges include leaders for Adidas, Columbia Sportswear and Nike.

More than 6,000 persons have studied at PFI since it opened in 2010. While most students come to PFI for a class or two, those interested in a career have gone on to start their own clothing lines, to work for one of the area’s many apparel companies or to gain entry into one of the top schools in New York, London or Paris.

Photo:  Workwear + sportswear is a design idea that achieves more than fashion and won Jefferson High School’s Gabriel Madlangbayan a scholarship to Portland Fashion Institute.  At PFI he plans to learn the skills to take his ideas into a career at one of Portland’s major apparel companies and beyond.  Here, his brother Curtis wears Madlangbayan’s award-winning idea.

Area fashion school and design house give creatives special access to Portland style

Portland has always had its own quirky style.  Classic comfort.  Unisex.  Tomboy.  Upcycling.  Interesting prints.  A mix of high and low.  Think of an oversized dress with running shoes.  Portland style has been copied nationwide.

The city’s independent design scene supported nearly 100 boutiques four years ago.  COVID-19 pandemic closed nearly half of them.

Enter Portland’s only fashion design school and one of its leading designers.

“We have a plan to promote Portland’s aesthetic and rebuild the independent design scene to get ready for a post-COVID world,” says Sharon Blair, Portland Fashion Institute’s director.

She has worked with AltarPDX designer Cassie Ridgway to turn some of AltarPDX’s most popular designs into sewing patterns.

“While we boost the area’s economy, we hope this effort encourages people to make their own and upcycle what they already have,” Blair says.

“If it inspires them to create and sell their own designs, that’s great too.”

AltarPDX is sold worldwide.  Most all of the garments are recycled from deadstock.  All are made in America.

“Altar is particularly known for making seasonless staples that aim for a timeless and sophisticated aesthetic,” Ridgway says.  “For this project, we chose garments that year-after-year can transition to new eras of our lives.”

“I can’t wait to see how everyone applies their own sensibilities to these projects.”  Each of the patterns is styled as a “classroom in a book”, with detailed illustrations and links to videos, “so even beginning stitchers can complete a garment they will love to wear.”

Part of the proceeds goes to another collaboration between PFI and AltarPDX.  The two are working on a grant to create an apparel production training program for at-risk, underserved youth in a Portland-area alternative public school. The program would train low-income teens so they can secure high-demand, well-paying jobs in the apparel industry.

PFI’s next group of patterns comes from designers Sarah Donofrio of One Imaginary Girl and Project Runway, plus Liza Rietz of The Ones whose garments show at art galleries as well as her own boutique.

Patterns are available at pfisewing.com and altarpdx.com

What is the best iron to buy?

Q. I need an expert opinion, so I am turning to you. I need a new Iron and am sick of “home professional’ ones that don’t seem to last. Do you have an iron you like? — Elizabeth

A.  For as much ironing as you do, you have to step up to a Naomoto Gravity Feed Steam Iron. Never fail. Never scorch. We’ve used ours in the school for a decade without any problems.  We all know a good iron is key to a professional finish.  You should be able to find one in your price range on AllBrands.com