Latest fashion trends from London, Milan & NYFW & how to use them

We like trends. Not because it makes us want to run out and shop. Instead it gives us a fresh look at the clothes in our closet and find new ways to mix and match. It lets us perk up an existing capsule wardrobe.  If you want something new, we say #makersgottamake Do it yourself. Choose the right fabric. Make it fit. Do it once. Do it right.  It’s the sustainable thing to do.

So here we go. Perhaps you have something to rediscover or something new to bring life to your ensembles.  For example, old favorites such as animal prints, jumpsuits, big shoulders, yellow and lovely lavender made dominating comebacks. Try:

Beige
From Soybean to Desert Sand, shades of beige painted the runway like a rainbow of light browns.  Chicago Harper by Josh Buck


Mutton Sleeves

An intense 80’s revival with big sleeves and bigger silhouettes hit NYFW. Don’t want to go that far? Try mutton sleeves. We just patterned a pair in knit in our latest Pattern 4 class.  Cocoon Jacket by StudioSKB

Shirt Dress
Always a reliable staple, the shirt dress is ideal for professional fashionistas and stylish savants. Try it in trending color: yellow.  Day Dress PFI pattern #1551

Stripes
Stripes came in all widths. Stripped down, vibrant colors, pin stripes paired with chunky stripes, parallel prints running perpendicular to perforated patterns — stripes are in.  Lancaster Dress by StudioSKB

Slip Dress
The slip dress returns as a runway favorite. Although the original slip is simple, designers have gotten a little more playful for 2020.  Try it in trending lavender. Lingerie PFI pattern #7010

Animal Print
Animal print, electric and eclectic, lit up the runways this season. From cheetah and leopard in a variety of neon to zebra and sequins, there was enough fashion to fill a forest.  Davis Blouse by StudioSKB

Overalls & Jumpsuits
The blazer dress, wide-leg pants, and the leisure suit all had their day on the runway. Although these garments continue to walk the walk, the new “it” garment is the jumpsuit. A pair of pants that doubles as a shirt, chic as can be and comfortable to boot, the jumpsuit is perfect for every occasion.  Parker Jumpsuit PFI pattern #2051 (left); Marianne Jumpsuit PFI pattern #2015


Patchwork

Patchwork and prim, designers have spliced styles together to create a couture collection of textiles and fabrics.  A great way to recycle your fabric stash.  Fusion Jacket by Chuckslab

Structured Necklines
There was a lot of structure this season, from big sleeves (as we’ve seen) to skirts and blouses. But the true artistry was in the necklines, subtle and stylish. Fontaine Jacket by StudioSKB

That’s it. Everything old is new again. Shop your closet. Sew something wonderful to add joy and we’ll see you in 2020.

Men’s Trends for Spring/Summer 2020

Italy may be the first to show new directions in menswear but Portland is — for the first time — fast on the heels of these trends.  Our senior designers, Charlie Ryan and Viola Pruitt, are feverishly working on their menswear collections for the September 18 Fade to Light Fashion Show.  In can you want to get ready, here’s the latest in looks, fabrics, prints and colors.

(left to right)

STARK UTILITY

Utility is taking on a new modern look with clean, sharp lines and geometric cutouts. A play with monochromatic styling allows the look to usher in a strong Sci-Fi element and hint at futuristic workwear influence.

MODERN ZEN

We loved this modern interpretation at zen style, with raw simplicity and fanciful details showcasing a new way to do bare essentials. Unfinished edges, mismatched threads, and pleats make this all about repurposed comfort.

FUTURE SAFARI

The utility vest has been one of the biggest street style trends at all the fashion weeks. When paired back to a neon tee or worn with wrap around shield sunglasses, there’s a retro future vibe that takes it beyond basic workwear.

COSMIC CAMO

Camo never really goes away, but there is a new version that comes rendered in sheer fabrics and faded, dusty colorways. This cosmic twist has completely transformed this traditional military motif to resemble some kind of spaceage uniform.

TRADITIONAL TECH

Traditional menswear motifs received a refreshing update with unexpected fabrics such as sheer organza and cool-casted blues and purples in place of traditional navy and grey.

POWDERY PASTELS

Powdery pastels were spotted throughout Florence, often worn in a monochromatic way that added much-needed dimension to minimal yet retro tailored basics. The addition of details like pleats or utility pockets made these sweet hues even more interesting.

SPLICED

Pieced construction is taken to a whole new level with a kind of haphazard chaos that creates a kaleidoscope pattern of classic plaids and stripes.

IN BLOOM

Florence always has plenty of dandies to see. Really impactful florals were growing on everything from suits to tropical shirts, and all with a more realistic painterly effect and oversized scales to make the ultimate statement.

HORROR PLAY

B-movie horror was all over last season’s runways and now the look is being seen on the streets. With a low brow take on monster-inspired whimsy, there were Frankenstein prints, as well as studded embellishment and metal trim.

Courtesy of our friends at Fashion Snoops

Lake Oswego teens win $2,000 Fashion Design Scholarships

Charlie Ryan and Dieter Vlasich just landed a future in fashion design.

Each won a scholarship contest and $2,000 worth of fashion design classes at Portland Fashion Institute, an apparel design and sewing school in northeast Portland.

As a result, each will build their skills and create a portfolio that could land entry into a prestige fashion design university.

“Normally, we choose only one winner each year,” said PFI director Sharon Blair.  “But both of these applicants were so strong, we had to choose both.”

Ryan chose a sportswear theme he calls “Spacesuit for the Streets”.  A varsity lacrosse player, he took advantage of a knee injury to design what he saw was missing from menswear:  An updated angle on the traditional t-shirt, hoodie, sweatpants that every teen wears. Bright orange and white with lots of zippered circular pockets, his outfit is not only functional, it is stylish.

“I aim to create high fashion for everyday use,” Ryan says.

Vlasich won based on his designs for an oversized angular suit he calls a “reaction to the toxicity of modern society.

“I wanted something fierce, aggressive and empowered.” His colors and silhouette reflect current trends and reminded PFI’s judges of high fashion designers Yves St Laurent and Comme des Garcons.

“I’m looking forward now to learning professional techniques at PFI,” Vlasich says.

Both taught themselves to pattern, fit and sew. Both are 17.

Vlasich plans to attend Central St. Martins in London. Ryan is interested in possibly attending Parsons or Fashion Institute of Technology in New York.  All three schools are internationally recognized colleges for fashion design. Their alumni include designers Donna Karan, Calvin Klein, Marc Jacobs, Zac Posen and Stella McCartney.  Such schools require portfolios as part of a very competitive admissions process.

This is the eighth year for the annual contest. It is open to full-time students in Portland and Vancouver area high schools who have a GPA of 2.5 or more. Each contestant creates an original apparel design idea with sketches, interviews of influential people and an essay on fashion design.

Judges included directors and managers for Kroger, Columbia Sportswear and Nike.

More than 6,000 persons have studied at PFI since it opened in 2010.  While most students come to PFI for a class or two, those interested in a career have gone on to start their own clothing lines, to work for one of the area’s many apparel companies or to gain entry into one of the top schools in New York, London or Paris.